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Privacy policies affect quantity of genetic testing
Different types of privacy laws in U.S. states produce markedly different effects on the willingness of patients to have genetic testing done, according to a new study co-authored by an MIT professor. As the research shows, policies that focus on the privacy risks of genetic testing, and ask for patient consent to those risks, lead to a reduction in tests performed. But policies that emphasize limits to further disclosure of genetic data without consent, a ...
EurekAlert - Wed. Dec 13
The public fear sharks less when they understand their behaviour: Study
An experiment involving more than 500 visitors to an aquarium shark tunnel has shown the public s fear of sharks reduces when they learn about the species by watching their behaviour. University of Sydney researchers conducted a randomised experiment in Shark Valley at SEA LIFE Sydney Aquarium in November 2013, by setting up iPads running survey software at the entrance and exit of a shark tunnel . Aquarium visitors were asked questions about their percept ...
EurekAlert - Wed. Dec 13
Alcohol taxes are too low, have not kept up with inflation
PISCATAWAY, NJ - State alcohol excise taxes are typically only a few cents per drink and have not kept pace with inflation, according to a new study in the January issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs . Raising those taxes, according to the authors, represents an opportunity for states to increase revenues while simultaneously improving public health outcomes and costs related to excessive alcohol consumption. Although excise taxes are the ...
EurekAlert - Wed. Dec 13
Racial, political identities influence how people view cause of deadly police ...
LAWRENCE -- People s racial and political identities strongly shaped how they viewed the causes of several recent widely publicized police encounters that resulted in the deaths of African American men, according to a new study by two University of Kansas researchers. The KU political science professors found that racial and political identities shape our understanding of these events African Americans, liberals, and Democrats generally attribute the cause ...
EurekAlert - Wed. Dec 13
Improving cyber security in harsh environments
Many people don t worry about the security of their personal information until it s too late. And protecting data is even more important for military personnel, whose lives could be in danger if some types of information were to get into the wrong hands. Now, one group reports in ACS Nano a new way to protect data, especially when it is subjected to extreme environmental conditions. According to the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation, the financial loss ...
EurekAlert - Wed. Dec 13
Study: Most enrolled in Michigan's Medicaid expansion already either work or c...
ANN ARBOR, MI - Nearly half of the people who enrolled in Medicaid after it expanded in Michigan have jobs, a new study finds. Another 11 percent can t work, likely due to serious physical or mental health conditions. About 1 in 4 enrollees are out of work but also are much more likely to be in poor health, according to the findings published in JAMA Internal Medicine by a team from the University of Michigan Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation. ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Dec 11
New statistical method links vast records, shows negative effect of Texas vot...
ALEXANDRIA, Va. December 11, 2017 - As state voter identification ID laws across the country are being contested amid questions about the integrity of the voting process, researchers have developed a new statistical method that not only matches multiple records with precision, but can also identify the scope of discrimination when applied to voter ID laws. Recently featured in the American Statistical Association s journal Statistics and Public Policy, the ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Dec 11
Doctors show race and social bias in study - but clinical decisions 'unaffected'
While most clinicians at a trauma center showed unconscious race and social class biases in a web survey, these did not influence their clinical decision making when quizzed about, for example, whether to order a test or reach a certain diagnosis.
Medical News Today - Sat. Dec 9
Study finds recreational drug users not what we think
A reasearcher from James Cook University in Queensland has been investigating why Australians are among the top users of illegal drugs in the world - and has uncovered some revealing new facts about the motivations of recreational drug users. Professor David Plummer led a study by JCU and Griffith University that interviewed drug users. We weren t satisfied enough work had been done to explain why there was such a high level of drug use in Australia and we ...
EurekAlert - Sat. Dec 9
Swansea research finds babies that feed themselves have no increased risk of c...
The research was carried out by Dr Amy Brown, Associate Professor in Child Public Health, and maternal and infant health researcher. 1151 mothers with a baby aged 4 - 12 months solids are not recommended until 6 months of age, but some mothers introduce earlier reported how they gave their baby solid foods, what foods they gave them and whether their baby had ever choked. Overall no difference was found in how often their baby had ever choked amongst mothe ...
EurekAlert - Sat. Dec 9
Mindful yoga can reduce risky behaviors in troubled youth, says UC research
For some young people, dealing with life stressors like exposure to violence and family disruption often means turning to negative, risky behaviors -- yet little is known about what can intervene to stop this cycle. But one long-term study by the University of Cincinnati looks at the link between stressful life events and an increase in substance abuse, risky sexual behaviors and delinquency in a diverse population of 18- to 24-year-old youths. The researc ...
EurekAlert - Sat. Dec 9
USC researchers develop method to ensure human rights in public health services
When measuring the success of public health work -- from immunizations to family planning services -- experts rely on sets of standardized indicators. But these indicators often neglect the voices and human rights of people who use the services, according to USC researchers. The USC Program on Global Health Human Rights and the World Health Organization WHO developed a new methodology, published by PLOS ONE , to determine the extent to which commonly used ...
EurekAlert - Sat. Dec 9