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New Amazon threat? Deforestation from mining
Sprawling mining operations in Brazil are destroying much more of the iconic Amazon forest than previously thought, says the first comprehensive study of mining deforestation in the world s largest tropical rainforest. The research, published in Nature Communications , finds that mining-related forest loss caused roughly 10 percent of all Amazon deforestation between 2005 and 2015, much higher than previous estimates. Surprisingly, roughly 90 percent of de ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Oct 20
New study shows TBI laws effective at reducing rate of recurrent concussions
Since 2014, all 50 states and the District of Columbia have enacted one or more traumatic brain injury TBI laws, more commonly known as concussion laws. These laws often include mandates to remove athletes from play following an actual or suspected concussion, requirements to be cleared to return to play, and annual education of coaches, parents, and or athletes regarding concussion signs or symptoms. A recent study from the Center for Injury Research and ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Oct 20
When new players learn slot-machine tricks, they avoid gambling addiction
Novice gamblers who watched a short video about how slot machines disguise losses as wins have a better chance of avoiding gambling problems, according to new research. Slot machines present losses disguised as wins LDWs with celebratory music and flashing lights, even though players actually won less money than they bet. People can mistakenly believe that they are winning and continue paying to play. Researchers at the University of Waterloo found that sh ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Oct 20
'Revising the image of Islamic law'
With the study of maxims in Islamic law, a genre of legal formulas that has so far barely received any attention, scholars are shedding new light on Islamic legal history. One can read often that the law has virtually not changed over the centuries , says scholar of Islamic studies Prof. Dr. Norbert Oberauer of the University of M 252 nster s Cluster of Excellence Religion and Politics , who is one of the first researchers to address the maxims. However, o ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Oct 20
Police satisfaction in developing countries dependent on less corruption
Improving police satisfaction in developing nations will require a reduction in corruption and greater public security and safety, a new study by researchers at the universities of Kent and Utrecht has shown. The research suggested that, even in situations where people felt they had been treated fairly by the police, satisfaction could be undermined by an awareness of police corruption and ineffectiveness. Dr Thomas Akoensi, of Kent s School of Social Poli ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Oct 20
Study: 3 million Americans carry loaded handguns daily
An estimated 3 million adult American handgun owners carry a firearm loaded and on their person on a daily basis, and 9 million do so on a monthly basis, new research indicates. The vast majority cited protection as their primary reason for carrying a firearm. Researchers from the University of Washington School of Public Health, the University of Colorado, the Harvard School of Public Health, and Northeastern University produced the study, to be published ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Oct 20
Women in science ask fewer questions than men, according to new research
Stereotypes suggest that women love to talk, with some studies even finding that women say three times as much as men. But, new research from a team from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, shows there is an exception to this rule professional STEM events, which could be indicative of the wider problem of gender inequality in the field. In new research published in PLOS ONE , the scientists studied question-asking behaviour at a large international c ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Oct 16
The costs of transporting petroleum products by pipelines and rail
While the policy debate surrounding crude oil transportation costs has emphasized accidents and spills, a new study by Carnegie Mellon University and University of Pittsburgh researchers indicates the debate is overlooking a far more serious external cost - air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions. Heinz College of Information Systems and Public Policy Professors of Economics and Public Policy Karen Clay and Akshaya Jha, the Department of Engineering and ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Oct 13
Criminal offenders with genetic mental disorders judged more negatively
Popular literature, crime dramas and recent trials dominating the media imply that defense attorneys who portray their clients as victims may have better outcomes. The belief is that jurors assign less blame to defendants they feel have been wronged. New research from the University of Missouri has shown that offenders with genetic mental disorders that predispose them to criminal behavior are judged more negatively than mentally disordered offenders whose ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Oct 13
Law enforcement-related deaths in the US undercounted in official government d...
The number of people who die as a result of injuries inflicted by law enforcement officers in the United States is undercounted in official government data derived from state death certificates. That is the conclusion of a study by Justin Feldman of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, USA, and colleagues published in PLOS Medicin e. The study showed that compared to The Counted, a news-media-based resource that documented 93.1 of the estimated 1 ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Oct 13
More than half of police killings not officially documented on US death certif...
Key Takeaways A total of 1,166 people were killed by police in the U.S. in 2015 Law enforcement-related deaths were vastly undercounted in a key national database in 2015 because they were misreported on death certificates Rates of undercounting were highest in lower-income counties, among blacks and people under age 18, and when deaths involved non-firearm means such as Tasers Boston, MA - Official death certificates in the U.S. failed to count more than ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Oct 13
Researchers map the illegal use of natural resources in the protected Brazilia...
New research published in the open access peer-reviewed journal PeerJ uses law enforcement data collected from 2010 to 2015 to understand the geographical distribution of the illegal use of natural resources across the region s protected area network. In the study, a total of 4243 reports of illegal use of natural resources were evaluated and mapped. These reports generated US 224.6 million in fines. Overall, 27 types of illegal uses of natural resources w ...
EurekAlert - Fri. Oct 13