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Cannabis: It matters how young you start
What a difference a year or two can make If you started smoking marijuana at the start of your teens, your risk of having a drug abuse problem by age 28 is 68 per cent, but if you started smoking between 15 and 17 your risk drops to 44 per cent, according to a new study by Universit 233 de Montr 233 al researchers. All the more reason, they say, to educate kids early, in primary school, about the risks of starting pot smoking, especially now that the poten ...
EurekAlert - Fri. May 18
ACR urges lawmakers to address rising costs and access barriers in arthritis c...
WASHINGTON, D.C. - Rheumatologists and rheumatology health professionals convened on Capitol Hill this week to urge legislative action on pressing policy issues affecting rheumatology care during the American College of Rheumatology s Advocacy Leadership Conference, held May 16-17, 2018 in Washington, D.C. Noting the rising costs and increasing access barriers in rheumatologic care, specialists encouraged lawmakers to support legislation that would create ...
EurekAlert - Fri. May 18
Doctors in US and Canada launch sweeping pharmaceutical reform proposal
WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The skyrocketing cost of prescription drugs is one of the biggest concerns for American voters. However, in his proposal last Friday, President Donald Trump failed to offer any new policies that would expand access, reduce costs, or increase the safety and efficacy of prescriptions. Today, a group of 21 prominent physicians published a comprehensive proposal to ensure universal access to safe, innovative, and affordable medications. Hea ...
EurekAlert - Fri. May 18
At the forefront of developing new insights into peacebuilding
The contribution of economic, social and cultural rights to sustaining global peace is largely overlooked within new developments to tackle violent conflict, says new research led by Lancaster University. Such conflict is surging after decades of relative decline and direct deaths in war. Refugee numbers, military spending, and terrorist incidents have all reached historic highs in recent years, according to the new UN World Bank study Pathways to Peace . ...
EurekAlert - Mon. May 14
Penn experts call for safeguards if Medicaid work requirement policies prevail
PHILADELPHIA -- When the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services CMS announced controversial policies inviting states to establish work requirements as a condition to receive Medicaid, many in the medical community opposed it. Groups like the American Academy of Family Physicians and the American Psychiatric Association said the policies would create considerable health risks and financial harm among vulnerable populations and be at odds with efforts to ...
EurekAlert - Mon. May 14
Majorities see government efforts to protect the environment as insufficient
WASHINGTON, D.C. May 14, 2018 - Majorities of Americans say the federal government is doing too little to protect key aspects of the environment, according to a new study released today by Pew Research Center. In a national survey of 2,541 U.S. adults, 69 of Americans say the federal government isn t doing enough to protect water quality of lakes, rivers and streams and 64 say the same about air quality. Two-thirds 67 say the government is doing too little ...
EurekAlert - Mon. May 14
Cannabis use up among parents with children in the home
NEW YORK--Cannabis use increased among parents who smoke cigarettes, as well as among non-smoking parents, according to a latest study from researchers at Columbia University s Mailman School of Public Health and City University of New York. Cannabis use was nearly four times more common among cigarette smokers compared with non-smokers. Until now, little had been known about current trends in the use of cannabis among parents with children in the home, th ...
EurekAlert - Mon. May 14
Preparing for the 'silver tsunami'
Skyrocketing drug prices and the looming insolvency of Social Security and Medicare are just two of many pressing issues caused by America s surging baby-boom population, often referred to as the Silver Tsunami. What can be done about it In a recent article published in The Elder Law Journal , Sharona Hoffman, the Edgar A. Hahn Professor of Law at the Case Western Reserve University School of Law, urges policymakers to focus on the elderly population. Ever ...
EurekAlert - Mon. May 14
Virtual avatar-to-avatar interviews may improve eyewitness testimony
Immersive virtual environments -- where officials interview eyewitnesses using digital representations, or avatars, instead of interacting in person -- may increase the accuracy and amount of recalled information, shows research in Frontiers in Psychology . In this first-of-its-kind study, eyewitnesses of a mock car theft provided as much as 60 more information when interviewed in an avatar-to-avatar context compared to face-to-face interviews. Study parti ...
EurekAlert - Mon. May 14
Serving smaller alcoholic drinks could reduce the UK's alcohol consumption
New research published in Addiction , conducted by researchers from the Universities of Liverpool and Sheffield, highlights the potential benefits of reducing the standard serving size of alcoholic beverages. It is well known that alcohol consumption contributes to premature death and ill health, and alcohol-related harm places a substantial burden on society. Many drinkers find it hard to cut down and attempts to cut down often do not lead to actual reduc ...
EurekAlert - Mon. May 14
An ironic health care twist for undocumented immigrants
ANN ARBOR, Mich. -- They re in the country illegally. Or maybe they had protected status before, but lost it due to policy changes by the current presidential administration. Or they re waiting for word from Congress or the courts on whether they ll get to stay. Whatever their situation under the law, the 11.3 million undocumented immigrants currently in the United States still need, and sometimes get, health care. Even if they don t have health insurance, ...
EurekAlert - Mon. May 7
Medical aid-in-dying laws are increasing, but substantial barriers to access r...
Eight U.S. jurisdictions seven states plus the District of Columbia now allow physicians to prescribe a lethal dose of medication to a mentally competent, terminally ill patient, provided that certain conditions are met. Hawaii passed a medical aid-in-dying law in April, and similar proposed laws are currently under consideration in North Carolina, New York and other states. However, in the states were medical aid-in-dying laws are already in effect, patie ...
EurekAlert - Mon. May 7