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Lancet series, co-authored by NYU's Benzian, calls for 'radical reform' of ora...
A special Lancet Series on Oral Health, published today in The Lancet , presents an urgent need for radical reform of oral healthcare to prioritize prevention and integrate dentistry into primary care. The series is comprised of two papers, both co-authored by Habib Benzian, DDS, MScDPH, PhD, the associate director of global health and policy for NYU College of Dentistry s World Health Organization WHO Collaborating Center for Quality-improvement, Evidence ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Jul 22
Use of non-hospital-based provider-to-patient telehealth grew nearly 1,400%
NEW YORK, NY--July 23, 2019--From 2014 to 2018, private insurance claim lines for non-hospital-based provider-to-patient telehealth grew 1,393 percent, according to a new white paper on telehealth from FAIR Health, a national, independent nonprofit organization dedicated to bringing transparency to healthcare costs and health insurance information. The study draws on data from FAIR Health s comprehensive repository of over 29 billion private healthcare cla ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Jul 22
Study: Even in competitive markets, shareholders bear burden of corruption
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- A new paper co-written by a University of Illinois expert in the use of financial information in capital markets examines the relationship between political corruption and firm value in the U.S., and what prevailing forces potentially constrain or exacerbate the effects of corruption. While the U.S. traditionally ranks low on worldwide corruption indices, domestic political corruption still imposes substantial costs on U.S. shareholders ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Jul 22
New in the Hastings Center Report
Heritable Genome Editing in a Global Context National and International Policy Challenges Achim Rosemann, Adam Balen, Brigette Nerlich, Christine Hauskeller, Margaret Sleeboom-Faulkner, Sarah Hartley, Xinqing Zhang, and Nick Lee Ever since the birth of the first human babies from gene edited embryos last year, calls for governance of heritable human genome editing have intensified. But such regulations pose challenges there are legal differences across jur ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Jul 15
Drug companies' sexually explicit ads reaching too many youngsters
Virtually every day, millions of children and adolescents are being bombarded by sexually explicit direct-to-consumer advertising, despite pharmaceutical CEOs claims to the contrary. Leading business ethicist Denis Arnold from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte co-authored the study, Self-Regulation in the Pharmaceutical Industry The Exposure of Children and Adolescents to Erectile Dysfunction Commercials, published in the just released Journal ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Jul 15
Researchers push for better policies around toxic chemicals
From high levels of lead found in school drinking water to industry sites releasing toxic heavy metals into the air, over 40 years of regulations in the United States have failed to protect human and environmental health from toxic chemicals. In a new paper published in BioScience , Portland State University researchers contend that these failures result from the flawed governance over the continued production, use and disposal of toxic chemicals, and lay ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Jul 15
Shifts to renewable energy can drive up energy poverty, PSU study finds
Efforts to shift away from fossil fuels and replace oil and coal with renewable energy sources can help reduce carbon emissions but do so at the expense of increased inequality, according to a new Portland State University study. Julius McGee, assistant professor of sociology in PSU s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and his co-author, Patrick Greiner, an assistant professor of sociology at Vanderbilt University, found in a study of 175 nations from 1 ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Jul 15
Long delays prescribing new antibiotics hinder market for needed drugs
MADISON, Wis. -- U.S. hospitals wait over a year on average to begin prescribing newly developed antibiotics, a delay that might threaten the supply or discourage future development of needed drugs. A survey of how 132 hospitals prescribed six new antibiotics from 2014 to 2018 found that the average time to prescribe any one of the new drugs was 398 days. Teaching and research hospitals and large hospitals tended to prescribe the drugs more quickly than sm ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Jul 15
Private prisons have a political role in corrections issues in the US, researc...
CORVALLIS, Ore. - Private prisons play a political role in immigration and incarceration issues in the United States and the industry may face obstacles as well as opportunities in the current political landscape, a new paper from an Oregon State University researcher suggests. The big picture view of this industry shows that companies operating private prisons are political actors who shape politics and policies but also are affected by ongoing political ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Jul 15
The Lancet Public Health: Incarceration and economic hardship strongly associa...
Unique analysis of US county-level data finds a strong association between incarceration and drug-mortality, and economic hardship and drug-mortality, independent of opioid prescription rates County-level incarceration may provide a further, plausible explanation to the underlying geographic variations in US drug-mortality, with the highest incarceration rates linked with a more than 50 increase in drug-mortality compared to counties with lowest incarcerat ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Jul 15
How is marijuana legalization associated with teen use?
Bottom Line This research letter reports on the association between the legalization of medical and recreational marijuana and teen marijuana use. Researchers used data from the Youth Risk Behavior Surveys from 1993 to 2017, when 27 states and Washington, D.C., contributed data to the survey before and after medical marijuana laws were adopted and seven states contributed data before and after recreational marijuana laws were adopted. More than 1.4 million ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Jul 15
School suspensions related to increases in subsequent offending
About 3.5 million students are suspended each year, and school punishment has been tied to a variety of negative outcomes. A new study took a longitudinal look at how school suspensions are related to offending behaviors that include assault, stealing, and selling drugs. It found that rather than decreasing subsequent offending, school suspensions increase this behavior. The study, by researchers at Bowling Green State University and Eastern Kentucky Unive ...
EurekAlert - Mon. Jul 15